Ski-Biking in North America

Because of the level of stability afforded by three contact points with the snow, ski-biking is generally easier to learn and safer than skiing (although tuition is strongly recommended), making it an ideal activity for skiers who don’t get to the slopes as often as they would like to. It is also a lot kinder to the knees, allowing skiers with knee problems the opportunity to enjoy the slopes for longer without discomfort.

The fact that ski-biking is generally safer, does not mean it is boring or doesn’t require skill. Ski-bikes have been specially developed to travel and maneuver with speed, and stop abruptly when required in much the same way as conventional skiers do, so riders need to be in control of their ski-bikes at all times. As with any other snow sport, having the correct equipment is very important. Ideally, when sitting on the ski-bike, the upper part of the rider’s body should be parallel to the position of the lower legs with knees lower than the hip joint. Feet are attached to short skis and riders should grip the saddle with their knees, keeping the short skis, or ‘gliders’ close to the ski-bike. Instructors will demonstrate turns and stopping, ensuring the new ski-biker is competent and confident before heading for the slopes.

Because ski-biking is still a relatively new and unusual sport, it may be viewed with some mistrust by others on the ski slopes. So, as ambassadors of the sport, it is essential that ski-bikers are courteous and follow slope rules to the letter. For more information on ski-biking in North America, visit the American SkiBike Association website.